Tarn & Tarn-et-Garonne

Villages and Towns in Tarn & Tarn-et-Garonne

Rabastens

The rich history of Rabastens can be observed in and around this colourful town, whose medieval ramparts standing proud above the River Tarn and the stunning bridge spanning the river are both constructed of red brick. A saunter along the quaint streets reveals a wealth of stunning historic buildings. Beyond the town itself – busiest on Saturday mornings when the popular market takes over – hamlets, dovecotes and chapels nestle amongst the landscape of vineyards, orchards, fields, and, in the distance, the panorama of the Tarn plateaux. The banks of the river are ideal for a stroll, and a number of walking trails lead from the town out into the surrounding countryside.

Albi

Sitting on the bank of the Tarn River, the magnificent medieval town of Albi is nicknamed ‘La Ville Rouge’, due to its many pink-red brick buildings. It’s a magical place with little cobbled streets snaking between picturesque medieval houses, lovely shops and restaurants, cafés and cool squares. There are many points of interest, including the impressive Gothic style Sainte-Cécile Cathedral, the 11th century bridge, and the Toulouse-Lautrec Museum dedicated to the famous Albi-born artist.

Gaillac

Built along the north bank of the Tarn, Gaillac is a historic riverside town dating back to the 7th century. Typical of this area, the buildings are constructed of lovely rustic brick, and some half-timbered or arcaded. The town boasts a good number of restaurants, shops and other amenities including a sports complex and a cinema. There are interesting museums and sights to visit, and the Parc de Foucaud gardens are a lovely place to stroll beside the river. And last but not least, the town is at the centre of one of the oldest wine producing areas in France.

Castelnau-de-Montmiral

Castelnau-de-Montmiral is a miniature bastide, where half-timbered houses surround a central square. ‘Montmiral’ means ‘hilltop with a view’ and it couldn’t be a more apt name, as the village is situated along the crest of a hill above the valley of the Vère River. The original castle, depicted on the village’s crest, survived the English invasion during the Hundred Years’ War but was eventually destroyed in 1819 because of its bad state. Though the castle no longer exists, the views do, and visitors today can enjoy the panorama before a stroll round the arcaded square, a spot of lunch or some shopping at the weekly market.

Villas in Tarn

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